Stop the Train to Plasticville

I recently heard an interesting story about two young men from the Midwest who were headed off to college in California.  They were both really excited about meeting all the hot So Cal women they’d heard so much about.  When they arrived at school, one of the young men looked around and couldn’t believe his eyes.  The women really were beautiful!  The other young man, who lived in a separate dorm room, didn’t see what the big deal was.  He didn’t find any of the women remotely attractive.  The first man who thought the women were beautiful didn’t understand.  How could his friend be so blind?  Then one day, he visited his friend in his dorm room.  Plastered on the walls were pages and pages of Playboy centerfolds.  Beautiful “airbrushed” women.  “Now, these women are beautiful,” his friend exclaimed.  Suddenly, it all became clear.

If this was the young man’s standard of what was beautiful, no actual, living, breathing woman could compete.  Because no actual, living, breathing woman can walk around “airbrushed.”

Studies have shown that if you show someone pictures of a beautiful “airbrushed” woman over and over again, their brain actually adjusts and begins to associate beauty with the airbrushed image.  Then if you show them picture of a non-airbrushed, real human being – even the most beautiful person on Earth – their brain will register that person as unattractive.  Now of course, there are other ways to be attracted to someone, other than sight, but “visually” they look less attractive.

When I heard this, it frightened me.  With all the botox, plastic surgery and whatever else is out there to “enhance” our beauty – what type of future are we headed toward?  A world where a normally beautiful person is perceived as ugly because our brains have been conditioned to see beauty as “plastic” and unreal? Are we actually conditioning ourselves to perceive “plastic” as beautiful?

Well, just when you thought that beautiful “image” of yourself was unattainable – because let’s face it – we’re not all cover models — you’re wrong.  You too can become a plastic version of yourself.  Yes, that’s right.  The average person can now airbrush their photos, just like they do in magazines.  I saw an ad for a company that does this for you.  They’ll adjust your nose, enhance your breasts, give you highlights – the works!  Why spend the money on surgery, when you can “fake yourself up” digitally for a bargain price?  Which is what a lot of people are doing on the dating websites by the way.  Don’t they realize they’re going to have to actually MEET the person at some point?

I could go into how I believe we’re being controlled by the media – aka large corporations, who want us to feel bad about ourselves so we’ll spend money on their products – but that’s another lecture.  My point here is, as spiritual beings having a human experience, aren’t we missing the point?

If the reason we incarnate to Earth is not only to learn to LOVE ourselves and others—but to EXPERIENCE all that this beautiful world has to offer, why are we making it so hard on ourselves?  Why the obsession with dieting?  Why the obsession with botox?  Why the obsession with how we look?   It’s almost impossible to love and accept ourselves when we’re comparing ourselves to fake, unattainable, unrealistic images of how we’re supposed to look.  And how can we experience the sensations of life, if we’re so worried about living up to someone else’s manufactured idea of beauty?

I’m not saying that we shouldn’t live healthy lives with diet and exercise, but I think it’s time to WAKE UP.  We’re being conditioned to the point that our brains can no longer see real beauty.  And even worse, in order to obtain an unrealistic version of ourselves, we’re depriving ourselves of the very experiences we came here for.   Like eating ice cream!  “Oh, no, there are too many calories in that.  I might gain an ounce.”  Or playing in the rain!  “What if someone sees me with wet hair?”  God forbid!  And worse, what if they take a picture?!  No problem. Just airbrush it.  And while you’re add it, fix those ears… Can you say, Dumbo? Oh, please!

I think this is a topic that many women have been discussing for a while now, but I don’t see it really changing much.  I still hear about women in their 20’s getting botox and teenagers begging for boob-jobs, and it really alarms me.   There are many organizations being formed to combat this problem, one by my dear friend, Amber Krzys who founded the bodyheart program that encourages and empowers women to love their bodies.  This gives me some hope.  But I think we still have a long way to go.  If this doesn’t stop, before you know it, everyone will have to be “botoxed out” just to look “normal.”  And frankly, I’m afraid of needles…  So come on, let’s learn to LOVE ourselves NOW for who we are and stop this downward spiral into the abyss of Plasticville!  I don’t want to have to go under the knife.  But don’t do it for me– do it for yourSELF!

With Love, For the highest good…

xo, Christy Jacobs

For more information on Amber’s bodyheart program, please go to http://bodyheart.com/

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3 thoughts on “Stop the Train to Plasticville

  1. Don’t ever believe the photos of stars and models you see in magazines. Photoshop can do magic by reversing years, wrinkles, bumps and pimples. You can have different color eyes, different shape of your neck, thinner waist, longer legs. It’s not that difficult to do! No star or model image you see in publication is real. Our little girls, and we as women strive to look like these fake images! Its absurd.

  2. Christie, I love your website and blog, i’d love to mention you in my blog http://www.Thewomensadvocate.wordpress.com
    as you are a true healer in every sense of the word and a beacon of light for all women.
    I felt like you were talking to me on your webpage “He Swept Me Off My Feet” as i’ve been going through a spiritual and physical transformation for the past three years. I can definitely relate to the “He swept me off my feet- then dropped me” part…
    Much Love and Light,
    Susan
    a.k.a. “The Women’s Advocate”

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